SHITE OLD ACTORS SAY – Episode #1

SHITE OLD ACTORS SAY – Episode #1

Greetings - welcome to SHITE OLD ACTORS SAY! This is the first broadcast of a weekly chat that Michael and Tommy will be having - bringing together thoughts and views from both sides of the Atlantic on the profession of acting. Thank you for joining us - please comment, ask questions - and give any suggestions for topics you'd like our thoughts on
Aston Origin microphone & Halo vocal booth

Aston Origin microphone & Halo vocal booth

For any actors out there considering getting into voice- over work from home, the technological hurdles can seem daunting. A major part of this is simply choosing the right tools for the job - especially if you're on a budget. I have been very fortunate while doing my research, to have come across a new microphone manufacturer from the UK who not only make outstanding high-end products, but don't charge the earth for the privilege. I was bowled over when I learned what an economic choice these items represent, especially as they are also manufactured in the UK. Hope this little video helps.
Simon Cox on KALEIDOSCOPE MAN

Simon Cox on KALEIDOSCOPE MAN

In 2006, UK filmmaker Simon Cox announced to a group of friends that his new movie, Kaleidoscope Man, would be the biggest British indie sci-fi movie of all time - A sweeping statement? Or was it?

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 18.42.34 After years of trying to get his second movie funded through traditional film industry routes, it was at this moment that Simon made the decision to stop chasing carrots and do whatever needed to be done to achieve his dream; making an epic sci-fi movie that would move and inspire people in the same way the original Star Wars inspired him. But, he was in his 40's with a young family, broke, feeling washed up and beginning to realise that perhaps Hollywood wasn't about to come knocking. Now in 2016, Simon has nearly finished the hugely ambitious Kaleidoscope Man. And its good. In fact, it's very good. But the road to getting it made has certainly been rocky and full of challenges and the finance to do it has not fallen into his lap. Yet, his determination and passion has lamented the support from thousands across the world - And at this moment, the eyes of the UK film industry are upon him.
  • Come to our fascinating one day seminar and discover from Simon himself just how he and a team of friends have managed to pull off this incredible feat.
  • How they convinced 700+ people to run from attacking alien ships in Central Birmingham.
  • Built the international space station in a warehouse in Nuneaton (with materials from Wikes DIY store).
  • How they convinced 80's pop icon Toyah Willcox to star in the movie.
  • Sent fleets of attacking alien ships flying over Central London.
  • Turned Birmingham into a deserted battlefield.
  • Got primetime TV coverage on BBC London Tonight.
  • Discovered a young illustrator who went from creating images for Kaleidoscope Man to
  • Godzilla, Star Wars the Force Awakes and now Star Wars Rouge One.
  • Pulled together over 500+ people to help get the movie made.
You'll hear amusing anecdotes, see fascinating behind the scenes videos and some exclusive clips from the movie - before anyone else sees them. Catch Simon now before the movie hits the big screen and discover for yourself how with a little passion and determination YOU can achieve your dreams too.

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AN-017 | Look at me, look at me, look at me …

AN-017 | Look at me, look at me, look at me …

Some of you may realise where the title of this podcast comes from. If you’re a fan of James Lipton’s ‘Inside the Actor’s Studio’ interviews, then you almost certainly will. In 2006 Lipton interviewed Dustin Hoffman and the conversation turned to Marathon Man and the time that Hoffman spent with Lawrence Olivier during the making of that film. Olivier was not well at the time. In fact Illness had nearly prevented him doing the film at all. It seems that those around him in 1975 were fearful that he may not have long to live, Hoffman included. Although Olivier didn’t die until 1989, there was an air of valediction to Hoffman’s time with him and this comes across in his emotional remembrance of the time at the end of filming they went out to dinner together. At some point in the evening Hoffman asked Olivier the question "why do we do it?". Hoffman says Olivier leant over and whispered in his ear: "Look at me, look at me, look at me, look at me".
Some of you may realise where the title of this podcast comes from. If you’re a fan of James Lipton’s ‘Inside the Actor’s Studio’ interviews, then you almost certainly will. In 2006 Lipton interviewed Dustin Hoffman and the conversation turned to Marathon Man and the time that Hoffman spent with Lawrence Olivier during the making of that film. Olivier was not well at the time. In fact Illness had nearly prevented him doing the film at all. It seems that those around him in 1975 were fearful that he may not have long to live, Hoffman included. Although Olivier didn’t die until 1989, there was an air of valediction to Hoffman’s time with him and this comes across in his emotional remembrance of the time at the end of filming they went out to dinner together. At some point in the evening Hoffman asked Olivier the question "why do we do it?". Hoffman says Olivier leant over and whispered in his ear: "Look at me, look at me, look at me, look at me". Although the story certainly inspires the title of this episode, the episode is not about Olivier and what he might have meant. However, if we, as actors admit to the resonance of those few words, then there is maybe something that we need to remind ourselves of as we navigate life and this thing called social media.